Key nutrients that may help treat eczema

Posted on :  January 10, 2022
Key nutrients that may help treat eczema
by Ashleigh Feltham Accredited Practising Dietitian and Accredited Nutritionist If you suffer from eczema, you understand the discomfort of the itchiness and then the throbbing from your skin being scratched. Your diet can play a key role in helping manage this skin condition. Here are some key nutrients to include in your diet which may help reduce or prevent a flare-up of eczema. Vitamin D and E These two fat-soluble vitamins, particularly when combined, may help treat eczema. Before heading to the supplements try using a food first approach. Food adds not only these two vitamins but additional health benefits for your body. Not many foods are rich in both vitamin D and E, but two good sources are eggs which include the yolk as well as seafood like the quality products available from Safcol Seafood. Zinc Zinc plays an important role in wound healing and reducing inflammation in your body. Good sources of zinc can be found in seafood, like seafood, nuts, seeds, red meat, dairy, poultry, legumes such as baked beans, and oats. Fish Oil There is limited evidence that supports including fish oil to help prevent eczema. Saying this there are many health benefits to including seafood two to three times a week for overall health as the whole food includes a matrix of health benefits for your body. Good sources of fatty fish with more omega-3 fat include salmon, sardines, herring, mackerel, and anchovies. If you are stuck for ways to include seafood in your meals and snacks, check out the recipes section on the Safcol Seafood website. It will provide you with the inspiration you need to add seafood to any snack or meal. Gut Health Although this is not a specific nutrient your body has a skin-gut axis. This means if your gut is not healthy the health of your skin is likely to suffer. help treat eczema by including two probiotic-rich foods each day like miso, yoghurt, tempeh, soft cheeses like cottage cheese, and natto. Also, the prebiotic-rich foods and polyphenols supply the food to keep your healthy microbes alive and look after your health. A good lifestyle strategy is including 30 different plant foods each week.

Take home message

Your skin is an organ that reacts to the diet you feed it. Help treat eczema by including an overall balanced diet that includes these key nutrients above it may provide some support in relieving your eczema or preventing flare-ups.
Not only is Safcol the Seafood Experts tuna lunchbox friendly, but it also tastes delicious, and boasts some amazing health benefits! Tuna contains Omega-3 fats that are an unsaturated form of fat called polyunsaturated. These types of fats cannot be made by the body, so we need to include them as part of our diet to stay healthy. For good health, you need omega-3 fats in our diet, particularly the type which comes from fish and seafood because it contains two acids known as docosahexaenoic acid or DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid or EPA. These two acids are linked to better health for your body particularly for your brain and heart.
Reference:
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    3. Health Canada. It’s your health: the safety of vitamin E supplements. 2006 [cited 2015 Jan 21]. Available from: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/healthy-living/your-health/food-nutrition/safety-vitamin-supplements.html
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